Another zebra in the wall

historical-hatred:

animetcetera:

Chivalry is dead and feminism killed it.

Nah, try gunpowder and the rise of the merchant classes causing a social and military upheaval that led to a Germanic feudal idyll that was never more than a notion seldom thought of outside of poetry being…

cellarspider:

NOTHING CAN RESIST THE RED DOT

cellarspider:

NOTHING CAN RESIST THE RED DOT

why-i-love-comics:

Batman #113

written by Bill Finger art by Sheldon Moldoff & Charles Paris

why-i-love-comics:

Batman #113

written by Bill Finger
art by Sheldon Moldoff & Charles Paris

mazarinedrake:

factsinallcaps:

thankyouforyourcooperation:

factsinallcaps:

CATS HAVE LIMITED OBJECT PERMANENCE AND DON’T ALWAYS UNDERSTAND THAT TWO DIFFERENT DOORS CAN LEAD TO THE SAME ROOM

#SO IS THIS WHY MY CATS ASK TO BE LET IN BECAUSE IT’S RAINING #AND THEN…

dtysen:

secondgoddess:

Donato Giancola

No waaaaaay.

I had image no. 2 on my wall from the age of 13 onwards. It was in a flyer for an exhibiton I couldn’t go to, and so I’d no idea who the artist was. I wanted to know for years, before forgetting about it.

marvel-dc-art:

FF #13 cover by Mike Choi

marvel-dc-art:

FF #13 cover by Mike Choi  

about-faces:

The second part of Hugo Strange’s debut, from Detective Comics #36 (1940), written by Bill Finger, with art by Bob Kane and Jerry Robinson. Read Part 1 here.

While Hugo was rather obviously created to be Batman’s Moriarty-like nemesis in terms of both brain and brawn, his status as arch-enemy was quickly usurped by the Joker, whose first appearance in Batman #1 (which also featured Hugo’s next and most famous Golden Age appearance, The Monster Men) shares a few distinct similarities with Hugo’s.